Researchers have recently discovered that smokers could live longer and healthier lives if they would switch to vaping.

Per their research,when calculated on a per smoker basis, the 6 1/2 million smokers in the UK/US could live an additional 87 million years if they put down the cigarettes and switched to vaping.

This study was conducted over a 10 year period by the Georgetown Lombardi Cancer Centre.

Many variables were considered by the research team while conducting the study, including potential harm from using e-cigarettes, increases in youth vaping, and the cessation rate amongst those who haven’t switched to vaping.

The Georgetown University Medical Centre posted the following findings on its website:

After taking into account different scenarios involving the potential harm of e-cigarettes as compared to normal cigarettes and other variables as well,they came up with an optimistic projection and a pessimistic projection to describe potential outcomes of switching to vaping. Even under the worst case pessimistic projection, they predict that not only will lives of smokers be extended significantly, premature deaths due to smoking related issues will be reduced as well.

Under the pessimistic projection, 1.6 million cigarette smokers who switch to vaping will live an additional 20.8 million years when calculated on a per smoker basis. The optimistic scenario projects 6.6 million former smokers will enjoy an additional 86.7 years of life.

In addition to living longer, researchers discovered that these former smokers enjoyed other health benefits as well. Not only were they living longer, they were also suffering from fewer smoking related disabilities and had fewer smoking caused diseases.

These astonishing findings were published in The Tobacco Control control. Authored in part by Dr. David Levy, an oncology professor at Georgetown Lombardi, their findings conclude that supporting a public policy of encouraging smokers to switch to vaping would yield substantial health benefits and longer lives when compared to those who continue to smoke.

This groundbreaking study was funded by The National Institutes of Health with the participation of research scientists from several universities and research groups from all across the country.